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Australian scientists deliver new mineral exploration insights

Minerals Research

Minerals Research Institute of Western Australia (MRIWA) issued publication of MRIWA research report M470 – Mineral systems on the margins of cratons: Albany-Fraser Orogen / Eucla basement.

This new geological research will help unlock deposits of gold, nickel and other valuable resources in the Albany-Fraser region 700km east of Perth.

Research scientists led by Professor Chris Kirkland from the Curtin University School of Earth and Planetary Sciences used cutting-edge geochemical techniques to reveal the ancient history of minerals locked within the underexplored mineral province.

Professor Kirkland said the minerals research, which was supported by the Minerals Research Institute of Western Australia and the Geological Survey of Western Australia, would help companies reduce exploration risks and better identify new ore deposits.

“The Albany-Fraser belt inherited a geological weakness from the Kalgoorlie-Boulder region,” Professor Kirkland said.

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“Over the past 1.3 billion years, this weakness acted as a mineralisation superhighway that delivered rich deposits of highly-valuable resources to the Albany-Fraser region.

“By tracing the chemical history of this mineralisation, we can better identify areas where these ore bodies might be located.”

MRIWA CEO Nicole Roocke said the minerals research helped explain why so many exciting mineral discoveries have been made in the Albany-Fraser region in recent years.

“It’s encouraging to see the Western Australian Government continue to support world-class scientific research of this kind,” Ms Roocke said.

“It not only supports local industry but also helps WA maintain its position as a global leader in mining exploration and production.”

A technical report summarising the research findings is available online.

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AMSJ Nov 2021