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Grosvenor mine explosion | UPDATE

Anglo American Grosvenor Mine

Anglo American has provided an update on Grosvenor coal mine explosion that occurred 6th May 2020 as investigators try to piece together what went wrong. The mine explosion left five miners with extensive burns to their torso’s and airways while working underground.

An Anglo spokesperson told AMSJ that overnight the five men who were injured in yesterday’s incident at Grosvenor Mine were transferred to Brisbane for further treatment, after receiving immediate medical assistance at Moranbah Hospital.

Four of the men have been intubated and are on ventilators. The Royal Brisbane and Women’s hospital has not released details of the miner’s condition however AMSJ has been informed that one of the miners is in a critical condition.

Operations at the Grosvenor mine site remain suspended, as Anglo works with relevant authorities to ensure the mine is safe to return underground to commence an investigation into the incident.

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Anglo American Grosvenor Coal Mine Explosion – FAQ

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Anglo American’s CEO of its Metallurgical Coal business, Tyler Mitchelson, said: “Our focus right now is on supporting our injured colleagues and their families, and our team is doing everything they can to provide support.   

“We are all devasted and we don’t yet understand what caused this incident. Once it is safe to return underground, we will commence an expert technical investigation to ensure we understand what has happened.”

Tyler Mitchelson, CEO Anglo Metallurgical Coal

“We will then work with our regulators and other stakeholders to ensure this type of incident never happens again.

“I would like to sincerely thank the first responders, mines rescue teams and all of the medical personnel involved in helping the injured people.” 

Industry in shock following explosion

The incident has shocked members of the mining community with many expressing disbelief on social media that an explosion of this ilk could occur at a modern coal mine.

One miner said “While we don’t understand the cause of the incident…it is clear that there was a catastrophic failure to manage the risk of gas in the mine. This is fundamental to safe coal mine management”

“Our industry must get to the bottom of this” another said.

Federal Resources Minister Keith Pitt said this morning “My thoughts are with the injured workers and their families following yesterday’s incident at the Grosvenor Mine near Moranbah in Central Queensland.”

“This is a distressing time for the Queensland mining community, particularly the workmates of the injured workers at the mine site.”

This morning that Keith spit said he had spoken with Queensland Minister Anthony Lynham who informed him that an official investigation is now underway to determine the cause of the accident.

Comment on Social media

The Queensland Government introduced a range of gas monitoring reforms on the 6th January this year following 264 methane gas exceedance incidents across Queensland’s mines.

As a result of the regulation, a number of mines across Queensland established gas monitoring in tailgate areas of longwall coal mines. The regulations required that electrical sources were interlocked to longwall shearers and automatic isolation occurred when methane concentrations reached trigger action response TARP levels.

Last night Queensland Minister responsible for mine safety, Dr Anthony Lynham said “Worker safety is in this government’s DNA and I expect a thorough independent investigation by the mine safety regulator.”

But many are questioning whether the Queensland Government has been able to effectively regulate safety in mines following a string of incidents over the last two years – many involving fatalities.

Just two days ago, AMSJ posted an article highlighting the increase in high potential accidents across the industry were pointing to more fatalities.

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6 Comments

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  • Typical of Anglo American…Constant corner cutting, unrealistic expectations, all in the name of corporate greed and demand and pressure they burden their employees and contractors with. The company expresses sympathy to the media, deep down they could not care less for those injured or for those who have died on their sites.
    Shame on you ANGLO AMERICAN. Moranbah North will be NEXT, mark my words. CH4 levels are through the roof.

  • If you look at Anglo American’s safety record and body count, not just in Queensland but globally, you don’t need a crystal ball to work it out. Send them back to England where their HQ is – they probably wouldn’t dare to allow this over there in the UK, as they’d likely be regulated, fined and prosecuted out of existence. We let them keep going here year after year and statistically, we know how they roll. We must like it and it must be the accepted standard. Kick them out or so be it…

      • Thank you Shane,
        Many years since I worked with you (if you are the same Shane) but good to hear you are still going strong. It is about time to call time. Everybody knows what is going on here – always have done.
        No point in hiding under a Bushell(s)…

  • I worked at an Anglo mine for four years, in my entire career I’ve never run across a mob so blinkered and so belligerent to concerns of safety and health and well-being. You could talk until blue in the face on any given topic and all you’d get was a blank stare and a comment that basically says back in your hole, we’ve done a wrack and therefore we know it’s safe. They have some of the best men working for them and I was proud to stand beside them but Anglo is a blight on the landscape and the reason why I left the mining industry. Get rid of them.

    • Well spoken, we all need to speak up and stop their disgraceful disregard for human life over resources and money.
      Take a look at lives lost in Australia and Globally in the past… shut these bastards down, make TYLER ACCOUNTABLE

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